Starving Artist's Sage Advice

amazinglyartisticadvice:

This is a new iteration, the list has been scrapped for the old ‘reblog and’ post.

Reblog this post to your art blog, and I will give you feedback on the content of your blog. I’ll tell you what works, what needs improvement, and how you might go about making those improvements. I will not…

Right off, I can see that you’re a very flexible artist who has a solid understanding of realism and bases their stylized art on that foundation. Your work also has a very dynamic, active quality brought to life both by your use of very lively,varied lines and by the postures of the figures that are the focus of your work. Your use of colour is very well done, with different kinds palettes for different sorts of pieces. Vibrant colours bring energetic works to life, and more sober, earthy tones give other pieces a feeling of solidity. I think work like your recent mouse in a t-shirt really shows your strength: Emotive portraits of anthropomorphic animals. It treads closer to the ‘animal’ than the ‘human’ however and gives your use of posture to convey emotion a chance to really come out and shine due to facial expression being limited. You also have a good grasp of character design, and make designs that are simultaneously ionically simple and yet very eye-catching and (especially in the case of your creatures) creative and enjoyable to look at. While many of your images show a figure standing or otherwise at rest, there’s nothing static about the poses they’re rendered in. Fantastic work. In the vein of improvement: ‘Cute’ seems to be your comfort zone. Most of your creations have rounded figures, rounded shoulders, and an overall friendly ‘cuddly’ feeling to them. While it’s perfectly alright to have a niche, and you can definitely choose to ignore the following completely, I think it might benefit you as an artist to stretch outside your comfort zone from time to time. And not only that, you’ll be able to contrast your more approachable designs with these less easily identified with types. Experiment with the scary, the austere, the hostile, the proud, and the otherwise unapproachable. Try sharper designs, or blockier ones, perhaps make an exaggeratedly thin character. See if you can convey through design that ‘this is a character who doesn’t much like anyone, really’ and go from there. You can treat it as an occasional exercise, if you like. Another area that bears a little more focus: Different lighting. Most of your pieces are done using essentially bright, natural light from directly above. Try thinking about what the effect different light sources and different environments might have on a piece. What would it look like if your light source was a candle? A campfire? What if your character is underwater? And so on. Have fun with light. I very much enjoyed looking through your work and look forward to seeing more from you! Good luck in all your endeavours, -SA

Feng Zhu’s video tutorial on Atmospheric Perspective.

occultoctopusinc:

**COMMISSION INFORMATION**
Plain and simple: One of my family members needs to move out quickly, so I’m trying to help raise the funds for her to put some things in storage until she finds a permanent solution.
With that in mind, some lower-than-usual prices for my work.
Waist-Up: $7.50 USD
Full-Body: $16.50 USD
Add Colours: $7
Add a Second Character: $5

You can contact me at spencematts[at]gmail.com
Payment will be through PayPal and the artist will send an invoice to the client.
Payment is due upfront, delivery of the work should occur within 7 days of purchase. If for any reason the work is not delivered within one month (30 days) of receipt of payment, the full amount of payment will be refunded.
This is very important so thank you in advance.

A template for final file size for creating digital comics.

If you don’t TRY impossible things, you don’t GET impossible things.
A Song for the Season

If you’re a comic book artist, you know it can be hard to get your hands on pre-ruled paper that’s the right size for your work.
Marking up your own pages can be a hassle, but if you’re planning on working in the industry, or just publishing your own work using industry sizes, you need to know how to do it.

The mobile app seems to have eaten two of my messages (I saved my replies as drafts, those drafts appear not to exist.)
To the two people whose questions are now lost in cyberspace: I’m sorry. I’m so, so sorry.

This is a T-square

If you’re a traditional artist working with comics, it is your best friend. 
Not only is it essential to getting lines to run perfectly perpendicular to the page, you need one if you’re going to rule your own pages. It’s a time-saver, believe me, and using a ruler is nowhere near as accurate on its own. 
You can get one for about $20 at most local art supply stores, OR you can go rummage through an office supply store like Staples and find one for approximately $10. It will not have inches marked out, however it’ll work just fine!

This is a T-square

If you’re a traditional artist working with comics, it is your best friend.
Not only is it essential to getting lines to run perfectly perpendicular to the page, you need one if you’re going to rule your own pages. It’s a time-saver, believe me, and using a ruler is nowhere near as accurate on its own.
You can get one for about $20 at most local art supply stores, OR you can go rummage through an office supply store like Staples and find one for approximately $10. It will not have inches marked out, however it’ll work just fine!

drawlequin:

kotzebue:

New Page! 

http://hominidscomic.com/

Here is my drawing process from start to finish on the latest page of my comic, Hominids. I love seeing how rough it starts at the very beginning.

Read my pal Jordan’s awesome comic, peebles! The art just gets more stunning with every page!

An incredibly thorough article/tutorial that explores gouache as a medium. Includes a step by step tutorial on technique as well as the history of gouache and a comparison to other traditional media.
Aspiring illustrators may want to give this a look, gouache is the preferred media for many classical illustrators because of its versatility and forgiving nature as a material.